Three new #opendata papers

Just in time for the Open Knowledge Festival in Helsinki we’ve added one new paper, and two new field notes to the Open Data Special Issue of the Journal of Community Informatics.

Simon McGinnes and Kasturi Muthu Elandy in their article Unintended Behavioural Consequences of Publishing Performance Data: Is More Always Better? question the mechanisms by which data may be able to bring about change, bringing thinking from complex systems to understanding the impacts of open data.

Anne Thurston from the International Records Management Trust (who are running a consultation right now on records management in open data) contributes a field note outlining some of the ways in which effective use of open data requires trustworthy records.

And Asne Kvale Handlykken brings lessons from the adoption of open source into the open data debate, with a field note from research into the politics of Free/Libre/Open Source Software (FLOSS) in the context of contemporary South Africa. Asne’s research highlights that movements for openness may be met by countermovements, or that commitments on paper may not lead to implementation.

You can find an overview of all the other papers in the issue here or head straight to the homepage of the issue.

We first published the issue in April ahead of the Open Government Partnership, and have since then continued to work with a number of authors to add key perspectives to the issue, and complete the review process for some of the articles. Just two more articles to come, and then we’ll be finalising the issue.

(Note: there seem to be some layout issues with the journal system for some of the articles right now – hoping to get this fixed soon – but all articles should be readable…)

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Open Data in Developing Countries


The focus of my work is currently on the Exploring the Emerging Impacts of Open Data in Developing Countries (ODDC) project with the Web Foundation.

MSc – Open Data & Democracy

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